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Survivor Spotlight: Larry Houghson

This is a story I submitted on Adrenaline Training Center’s (in London, Ontario, Canada) Facebook page Nov 2011 while fighting cancer. They had asked for people’s success stories.

 

My story is not about sports or weight loss, but it is about a fight. Recently I learned that I was in for the fight of my life. In my corner I already had my beautiful wife (Tammy), my family and a few close friends. Once Pete Brown who trains at Adrenaline Training Center and a member of Team Tompkins heard about my fight he offered to train with me at the gym.

 

I accepted his offer knowing I could use all the help available as my opponent had defeated many people before. With the love and support of my wife, friends, family and the new friendships I made at Adrenaline I knew losing was not an option.

 

On July 19th, 2011 the official announcement was made that I would compete in a 5 round title fight, my opponent for this epic bout, Stage 3 Testicular Cancer. 

 

After surgery and 3 intense Chemo treatments my doctor tells me that the cancer is almost gone. As I write this it is 4 minutes into round 5. I am in the hospital having one last round of Chemo and with that my opponent is falling to the mat in what might just be the knock out of the night.

 

In between my treatments when I was able to, Pete would meet me at the gym to train. Some days I would get tired fairly easy due to the Chemo and our workouts would not be as long as other days. He always offered a positive attitude and support; he didn’t care if I was training for 5 minutes or an hour. Even though I was at the gym to train with Pete the rest of the guys there were very supportive. I feel that I have made a lot of friendships from my time at the gym.

 

I honestly believe that, other than the love and support of my wife, who fought this fight with me, the team at Adrenaline was in my corner helping me get through this fight with a win. What I gained at Adrenaline may not have cured my cancer, but it made the fight a little easier.

 

I would like to thank my wife (Tammy), Pete Brown, Chris Horodecki, Mark Hominick, Alex Gasson and all of the other members of Adrenaline/ Team Tompkins for helping me get through this and making my story a success!

 

March 23 2015 was my third year in remission. I am so proud to be a part of this gym/ family! Thanks again to everyone who helped me kick cancers butt!

 

Survivor Spotlights Generic

 

Impact of Cancer in Young Adulthood Study

Were you diagnosed with cancer as an adolescent or young adult, between the ages of 13 and 39? Are you now over the age of 18?

Liane Kandler (Doctoral Student, Lakehead University, Canada) created an online survey to try and understand the impact of cancer and would like your input.

 

Email AYA Research Study for more information on how to complete the survey or visit the AYA Survey Research Facebook page Participants will be entered into a random prize draw for one of three prizes: a personalized iPod nano in the colour of choice, a Kindle e-reader, or a $100 VISA gift card!”

 

A recent blog post on the AYA Research Survey can also be found at the Cancer Knowledge Network.

 

Young Adult Cancer Survey Poster

Survivor Spotlight: Eric Mendelson

Testicular Cancer at 20?

The only thing on my mind was school starting. I had just received straight A’s, made a lot of new friends and was looking forward to getting an internship in the spring. It was less than a week before the spring semester would start and I was looking forward to going back to school.

 

I woke up just like any other day during winter-cold. Usually when I am cold, I stick my hands in my pants since most of my sweatpants do not have pockets. I noticed a small lump I had never felt before in my left testicle. This bump was not huge and did not cause me any pain. I told myself if I still felt it in a week I would notify my parents. The next night at dinner my brother asked my mom about a rash he had on his leg. She thought it might be herpes and suggested he get checked immediately. Since we were on the subject, I told her about the small bump. She told me to see a doctor before I went back to school.

 

The next day I went to the pediatrician (yes, I still go to the pediatrician). He had a hard time finding it but as soon as he felt it recommended I see a urologist immediately. He had no idea what it was but assured me there was something there. I was to see a urologist the next day to finally find out what this mass was. I will never forget sitting on my mom’s bed the night before. We were talking about my appointment and she asked me if I was scared. Usually I would say no, but for some reason my stomach didn’t feel good about this. She assured me that everything was fine and that this was probably just an infection. I agreed with her because I did not want to worry her, but that night my worst fears were not even close to the reality.

 

As soon as I got to the urologist’s office, my urologist requested I take a pee test to see if it was an infection or kidney stones. I had just urinated so I told him that he would have to wait. He asked me to show him the mass and I would do the test after. I showed him the bump and as soon as he felt it he left the room. He got on the phone and I heard him say “I don’t care if you are booked today, you NEED to see this kid! It’s an emergency”. He told me I would need an ultrasound to determine whether or not this mass was just a cyst or a scar or if it was a tumor. I tried to not think the worst but I started to get scared. I saw the screen while I was getting my ultrasound and noticed a black circle on my left testicle. I tried to keep calm, but it was getting harder and harder. I would bring the ultrasound results back to my urologist who would give me the horrible news.

 

My urologist, Dr. Bloom, sat me down and told me “There’s no easy way to tell you…but you have a malignant tumor on your left testicle that is cancerous. You will need to have surgery to remove your testicle”. No one in their life ever expects to hear they have cancer, but not having any family present was even more difficult. I told Dr. Bloom that he had to call my parents and let them know, there was no way I could ever tell them “I have cancer”. Hearing my parents’ reaction to that might be the hardest thing I have ever dealt with in my life.

 

It took me about ten hours for me to process I had cancer. Word spread so fast that people were calling and texting me all day to talk to me and to show their support. I received so much comfort right away that it was not until I was in my bed that night by myself that it hit me. I had cancer.

 

Nobody expects to get cancer, but I thought my case was very unique. I was 20 years old, worked out twice a day, ate very healthy, and had no family history of cancer. I never thought that anything would ever happen to me, that I was impervious to harm. I would need an orchiectomy and not be able to workout or lift anything over ten pounds for six weeks. This recovery time was especially hard for me. I can’t explain how hard it is to be so active one week and the next week, barely able to walk.

 

testicular cancer patient in a hospital bed

 

The recovery period was a changing point for me in my life. Not being able to attend school, exercise, or do anything pretty much limits how much you can do. A lot of my days were spent thinking about a variety of things. Having cancer affected me mentally as much as it did physically, it really changes who you are and your outlook on life. I told myself that after the six week recovery period was over that I wanted to be a different person. Although my life was not in jeopardy, it certainly changed my viewpoint on life. I cut out people in my life who I did not think were beneficial to me and changed my demeanor. I was always and still am a very generous and nice person. However, in the past I would sometimes allow people to walk all over me (partially because I’m only 5’5”). Coming out of this, I had the mindset that I just BEAT cancer and I would not let people disrespect me the way before. I also told myself that when the doctor told me I was cancer-free that I would get a tattoo to show my accomplishment as a reminder everyday that I beat cancer.

 

testicular cancer survivor tattoo

 

It has been a little over four months since my diagnosis and I could not picture my life being better. I am surrounded by amazing friends and family who constantly check up on me and make me feel appreciated. I continue to workout twice a day and am almost in as good shape as I was before surgery. Most people who find out I had cancer are very surprised because of how I look now and the energy I have.

 

Testicular cancer survivor picture

 

What’s in store for me now? I am heading into my senior year at Towson and am pursuing a sport management degree. I have to get frequent blood work, CT scans, and X-rays for the next four years with lessening frequency each year. I believe sometimes in life we have a revelation that lets us know we need change in our lives. I was never expecting cancer in my life, but I had to make the most of the unfortunate situation I was handed. I wake up everyday and feel blessed because I know not everyone is guaranteed tomorrow.

 

 

Couples Needed for Cancer Research Study

Participants needed for a study concerning the emotional aspects of cancer care

What implications do your partners’ psychological traits and self-conscious emotional factors have on your emotional responses?

 

In the Department of Psychology at the University of Sheffield, we are conducting research into how partners’ psychological traits and self-conscious emotional factors might impact on how people with cancer feel about themselves.

 

The study needs you and your spouse/partner to participate as a pair, but for the study to be valid and produce meaningful results you must complete the survey separately. The study involves filling out a series of short questionnaires and will take approximately 15 minutes. All responses are anonymous and will be treated confidentially.

 

As part of the research we would like to carry out follow-up administrations of the same set of questionnaires at 2 and 4 weeks following the initial survey. The aim of these follow-ups is to assess and get deeper understanding of people’s responses over time. Further information about the survey will be provided before you and your partner decide whether or not to participate.

 

A full debrief will be available following participation and we will give participants feedback on the results at the end of the study.

 

£1 will be donated to Worldwide Cancer Research for every dyad that takes part.

 

If you are interested in taking part in the research, please use the following link to access the study pages, find out more information and to take part by following the link to the survey below:

https://sheffieldpsychology.eu.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_2bNIc4T8xg8Qu2N

The study is password-protected and you will need the following password to log in: sheffpsy

 

Thanks, your participation is very much appreciated.

 

Regards,

Haffiezhah An-Nadiah Azlan

Survivor Spotlight: Rocco Buccheri

Rocco and his family in from of Touchdown Jesus

 

You have no balls… I do not know how many times in my life I have heard that statement, it has to be thousands of times. Every single in reference is based on the idea of me not being macho enough, or not having the guts to take on a challenge. I’m not saying that I am a wimp, but men tend to challenge each other’s “testicular fortitude” for basically anything.

 

Taken literally most people don’t really think about that statement, but for me, a bilateral testicular cancer survivor, this is a fact of life.

 

I was diagnosed the first time, on February 7th, 2007. At 22 years old, and in college, the last thing on my mind was cancer, so as you could imagine this diagnosis hit like a ton of bricks. I will never forget the moment, sitting in my Urologist’s office, (at that age I do not even think I knew what a Urologist was) he was telling me that I had cancer, I was in such shock, the doctor had to call my parents to explain the situation. Speechless, the doctor explained to me what the next steps were, and he noted how from the start that this cancer can be beaten. Moments after my diagnosis he was giving percentage chances of survival at 90+%.

 

Lucky, for me I had only felt the lump down there three days earlier, a simple self-examination. I cannot express how important my next actions were. Like I said early, at the age of 22, I could have felt the lump, and went on with my life, at that age any man basically feels indestructible, so it was pretty obvious that cancer was not on my mind. However something did not sit right with me, and I made the decision to not wait, I was in my primary care physicians office the next morning, and two days later I was in with the urologist, and by February 9th, I was having surgery to remove one of my testicles.

 

Seeing that this was such a quick turn around, I got even luckier to find out that my cancer had not spread, it was localized to the testicle and there was no need for chemotherapy or radiation.   My treatment plan was to start a comprehensive tracking program to make sure the cancer did not come back. In the first year, monthly blood work checks, x-rays and cat scans; second year every-other month, and so on. I was told that at five years you are considered cancer free, and have a clean bill of health. I was starting a long progress of being in a doctor’s office way more than I ever wanted, but I knew it had to be done.

 

That takes us to May 5th of 2010. My wife and I (at the time we were just dating), had completed the inspection on the home we were about to purchase the night before. I had the engagement ring ready to go for the first moment we were alone in the house together, it was a joyous time, and then I felt a lump again. I did not wait, within hours I was at my urologist’s office (this time I knew what that doctor treated) and was being told, you have testicular cancer again.

 

Being told the second time that you have been diagnosed with testicular cancer was harder than the first. I had been in a comprehensive plan to track and make sure it didn’t come back, and questions lingered. How would I start a family? What does this mean for my sex life? If we had been tracking it so diligently, how did this happen? Has the cancer spread this time? Without a doubt, the most mentally exhausting moment of my young life.  

 

This time around things didn’t move as quickly. The day I saw my urologist I was told in order to have a family I would have to cryogenically freeze my sperm. I would have to perform the act multiple times on multiple different days so that the center for reproductive services would have enough. I was also told that with the removal of my second testicle, I would not produce testosterone, and as such I would need to start and continue through the rest of my life testosterone replacement therapy. On May 28, 2010 I had surgery to remove my second testicle, and shortly thereafter I was told that again the cancer did not spread. Phewww! However in order to really make sure things were not going to come back my oncologist suggested one round of strong chemotherapy. Like the first time I was diagnosed I sought a second opinion, but unlike the first time I was given a different option.

 

My second opinion physician suggested that chemotherapy was one of a number of options, but tracking the disease as we did the first time would also be an option. This was without a doubt the hardest decision I had to make. I chose to not go through chemotherapy and track my disease just as we did the first time.  I am still counting the days to May 28th, 2015 (so close).

 

Being diagnosed with testicular cancer or any type of cancer is a struggle. It drains you physically and emotionally, it stresses family members and friends, and it makes you question some of the bigger picture in life.

 

As I mentioned earlier at the same time I was diagnosed I was ready to propose to my then girlfriend, and ready to buy a house. I was also working on my Master’s Degree in Business Administration. Quite the busy time for me.   It wasn’t until maybe 18 months later in which not having any balls really impacted my life. Lynne and I had been happily married for about six months, and were thinking about starting a family. In pure honesty, for most married couples these is an easy decision on when, and soon after that many couples are pregnant. For us it was completely different. We were faced with the challenge of when to start In Vitro Fertilization (IVF), and the cost of it.

 

After finding out that this type of treatment was not covered under either of our insurances, my wife and I had to decide how to pay for the $16,000.00 for the treatment. With both of us fairly young in our careers and being home owners, the money was not just there for us to go and spend. For three years we grappled with the financial responsibility of attempting to have a child, throughout the process a number of married friends and family made wonderful announcements that they were expecting. This is mentally draining for a couple who wants to have children but cannot afford it. It is like being completely torn as you are incredibly excited for your friends, but completely upset that it wasn’t you.

 

Finally after making some incredible tough decisions, in September of 2013 we decided to go for it, the IVF was paid for and the medications where in our hand. However going through IVF does not mean any guarantees of having a baby. The process of going through IVF is painful and tireless for a woman. I believe that my wife went through more pain and discomfort than I ever did with surgeries or any testing; IVF requires that you to inject your wife with multiple medications on a daily basis for almost two and a half months. It requires multiple procedures for the women, including the harvesting of eggs, and placement of embryos. Once an embryo is placed it is a waiting game.

 

One of the biggest decisions a couple has to make when choosing to proceed with IVF is how many embryos they want to put “in.” In our situation we decided to place two healthy embryos. This means that if both take than we would be blessed with twins. Many IVF places will even put more in, but the best places are ones that provide a high pregnancy rate with only a placement of one or two embryos.  Our treatment at the University of Connecticut Center for Reproductive Services in our state had the highest success rate with only placing one or two embryos.

 

Now to the good news, approximately a month after the placement of the embryos we found out Lynne was pregnant, we also found out that only one of the two placed embryos made it, we were expecting once child, what a blessing!

 

As a man, to be diagnosed with testicular cancer twice, provides itself with a number of different challenges.   The reality of my disease is with me every day; however, I consider myself incredibly lucky. I have read and learned about many people who have been diagnosed with the same disease and because of the situation had to treat with chemotherapy and radiation, and of course, a number of men will die from this disease even with today’s advanced medicine and treatment.

 

Our son Joseph Anthony Buccheri is now 8 months old, and is the greatest thing that has ever happened to us. If I can provide any advice to anyone who is reading this, is that the mental part of going through the thought of treatment and cancer has been the toughest part, even harder to deal with was the mental anxiety and anguish of attempting to start a family. However, any survivor reading this can know, that no matter how down you are about it, the next time someone says “you have no balls,” you can smile and laugh knowing that in fact that no matter what, you do, and you should be proud of it.

 

Also check out Rocco’s story that was featured on the local news.

Rocco's son

 

Rocco and his son

Not Many are Talking About Testicular Cancer

a chart showing who is educating about testicular cancer

 

Two out of three young men say, “None of these people” have spoken to them about testicular cancer.

 

Testicular cancer is the leading cause of cancer in young men age 15-35, yet not many people appear to be educating these young men about the disease.

 

In January 2015, the Testicular Cancer Society surveyed 1000 young men, age 18-34 in the U.S. and asked them, “Which of the following people have spoken to you about testicular cancer?” Respondents were given 5 multiple-choices in a multiple-answer format.

67% of respondents answered None of the Above

19% of respondents answered My Doctor

8% of respondents answered My Parent

8% of respondents answered My High School Teacher/Nurse

5% of respondents answered My Sports Coach

5% of respondents answered My College Professor/Nurse

 

These results indicate that those most likely closest to these young men are not discussing testicular cancer with them in a time when these young men are in the age group most at risk for the disease. While testicular cancer can occur at any age, opportunities to educate those at highest risk are being missed.

 

These results were also consistent with a previous survey conducted by the Testicular Cancer Society in November 2013, which indicated 71% answered None of Above, 16% My Doctor, 7% My Parent, 6% My High School Teacher/Nurse, 4% My Sports Coach and 3% My College Professor/Nurse.

 

For more information about this survey please contact the Testicular Cancer Society.

 

 

 

Only 1 in 3 Guys Know How to Check Their Testicles

chart of guys that know how to do a self testicular exam

 

Testicular cancer is the leading cause of cancer in guys age 15-35, yet a January 2015 survey indicates that only 1 in 3 young men know how to do a self-testicular exam.

 

The Testicular Cancer Society asked 500 young men, age 18-34, in the U.S., “Do you know how to do a self-testicular exam?”

32% of the respondents indicated Yes.

49% of respondents indicated No.

19% of respondents indicated I’m Not Sure.

 

If caught and treated early testicular cancer is almost 100% curable. However, if diagnosed in later stages the survival rates drop and the treatment burdens are increased. A monthly testicular self-exam can help men become more familiar with their bodies, lead to early detection of testicular cancer and possibly save their life because they’ve noticed changes.

 

What is troubling about the survey is that the men surveyed, age 18-34, are also men that are in the age group most at risk for the disease. 

 

In October 2014, the Testicular Cancer Society released their Ball Checker app in hopes of educating more men about how to do self-exams. Besides self-exam instructions, the app, available on iTunes and Google Play, allows men to schedule a reminder to do their monthly self-exam. You can learn more about the app at www.BallChecker.com

 

For more information on this survey, please contact the Testicular Cancer Society.

Survivor Spotlight: Jonathan Elliott

Testicular Cancer Survivor Jonathan Elliott and his family

I wrote my personal story a few months ago when I finally felt ready to revisit some of the memories. I thought I would share it more to support those that may be experiencing the same struggles in life.

 

A little over four years ago I found a lump. With this lump I found complete fear, anxiety, and uncertainty. I was paralyzed with emotions. I’m unsure of the following 5 days leading up to surgery, as everything became a blur. I remember sitting in the waiting room with my mother. Everything seemed cold, the floors, the chairs – the people. The only warmth was from my mother’s hand holding mine. I recall not being able to walk on my own to the operating room. I became weak in the knees and fell in the hall as I was passing operating room equipment that was covered in blood from the prior individual that was in surgery. What was their illness? What was their fate?

 

As I was supported into this bright white room these questions quickly slipped away from my mind. I was frozen in fear. I found myself lying on a cold table – arms stretched out in both directions, naked, scared. I looked around the room and seen roughly 5 other people preparing various things. I.V and needles being placed in both arms – at the same time – as another individual began to write lines on my lower abdomen. Another individual approached me with a document that I had to sign – agreeing that no legal action could be taken against the hospital if I died – more fear. I was told to count backwards from 10, 9, 8, 7 – the walls melted.

 

I woke hours later – reaching down in disbelief and complete pain. I seen a nurse walking by and attempted to ask a question. I got as far as “Is it…?”. She immediately stopped what she was doing while nodding “yes”. She came over to my side and took my arm for a few moments in a supporting gesture. The only medical staff that had shown feeling towards me – and I never even got to know her name.

 

I was sent home later that evening, unable to walk straight, and heavily medicated. I kissed my mother, I kissed my wife. I held and hugged my son – and prayed for the child that my wife had been carrying for the past 3 months.

 

Now I waited – fear, anxiety, and uncertainty – with every ring of the phone. Waiting for the phone call seemed to take forever. I was unable to do anything on my own. I was depressed and had lost my independence. My wife helped me get dressed, showered, cooked meals, and even assisted me with using the bathroom. My wife that was 3 months pregnant- suffering from severe morning sickness – and still caring for our 2 year old son.

 

Three weeks after surgery the phone rang. My wife answered it however she had to come and help me out of bed to take the call, as the doctor would only speak with me – fear, anxiety, and uncertainty. The walk down to the living room was a mirror reflection of how I felt walking into the operating room.

 

I cannot remember this conversation. I can remember my mother and wife embracing me – warmth. The cancer had spread to my stomach, abdomen, and my neck. I spoke with my family, my friends. My father passed away from Leukemia when I was 8. My mother fought cancer a few times and had won. So, this is my fate? This is how it ends? NO!

 

I was back at the hospital within 24 hours being prepared for chemotherapy. My veins were collapsing so I had another surgery to have a PIC line placed in my left arm – a tube that lead to my heart to deliver the chemo into my blood stream. I came home and spent time with my family and friends. I got everything in order. Work, Bank, Rent – Everything – including my will.

 

Four years ago today I stated my first chemo. I had to change everything, and everything changed. I did not focus on how I felt – I couldn’t – nor did my wife, as the stress would not be positive for our unborn child. I fought – She fought – We all fought! My wife was not able to come to my treatments due to being pregnant. My mother and family came as often as they could – I preferred to be on my own, as I wanted my independence. I did not want to be seen for my physical appearance however for the strength I had found in everyone around me. The first week of chemo caught me by surprise. It was everything you think it is and even more. I adopted a routine – I took control. Nothing was going to fuck with me!

 

While at home it was an interesting juggle of things. I would be in the bathroom from midnight until the morning hours due to the side effects of the chemo. My wife would then be in the bathroom for most of the morning due to the side effects of pregnancy. This was a blessing on its own as we only have 1 bathroom.

 

Around the third week of chemo my hair began to fall out. I did not recognize myself in the mirror anymore. I felt sad and depressed for a brief moment – I took control. I did not want this change in my appearance to bother my son – so as I was looking in the mirror I decided to write my name with a nice bold spot as I removed my hair in little chunks. It took me almost an hour however I did it. I had a bald spot that said “Jon”. I went downstairs and eagerly asked my son to read it. It took him a moment and he sounded it out “Noj”? Apparently I forget to take into consideration that when you write using a mirror it comes out backwards. Lesson learned and we have never forgotten this.

 

As the first 3 weeks came to an end I was getting bored – and bored of being sick. I had read everything I could find about my form of cancer, joined all the groups online, seen all the specialists. – I was not content and very anxious as a result. It was time for another distraction. My wife was now 4 months pregnant and we had yet to renovate and establish a nursery – Mission accepted!

 

After taking the bus to Wal-Mart and Millwork I was set to begin my next task. Within 2 weeks the nursery was painted, furniture built – I was at peace – and exhausted.

 

I would often walk daily to the hospital for my treatments. I was blessed to meet extraordinary people during this time –sadly lost some of the bravest as well. As I was walking home one day I was stopped by the police. I was questioned as to if I had been drinking and using drugs due to my appearance. The officer did not believe me – questioning the marks on my arms. The officer continued to ask me if I have any dirty needles on me as he was talking into his radio – not paying attention to what I was saying – he had already made up his mind on me. I was asked for my I.D and provided it – along with my cancer patient I.D card and a long list of medications that I was prescribed. I smiled as he attempted to read them out loud. I now had his full attention – but didn’t care. I kindly turned down the drive home and asked to be excused. I walked the rest of the way home with a large question mark floating around in my head.

 

I got home and checked the mail – an eviction notice. I promptly went over to the landlord’s home and rang the bell. I was greeted by a new landlord that only opened the door a small crack. She promptly seen the letter in my hand and stated, “You don’t pay your rent – you’re out!” and closed the door in my face. I was exhausted and went home. I sat in the living room questioning what had just occurred over the past hour. I went into the kitchen to get some water. I looked around and was not pleased with the colour – another distraction had been found. Three days later the kitchen was repainted – and had a nice highchair to match!

 

I reached out for support and attended an office of parliament. Sadly this meeting can be summed up as to the same prior mentioned police officer for the way I was treated by the reception lady. After waiting for over an hour in the office to meet with someone I was told that no one would be able to meet with me. I was asked to sign consent forms to open a line of communication. I struggled to the desk area after being seated for so long. I began to read over the forms as the members of parliament exited behind me. I attempted to introduce myself however I was greeted by blank stares –I seen the hesitation in their faces as I reached out to shake their hands. I was again judged all too quickly. I left the office and never looked back – and never voted for him again. I should add that he lost the recent election. I returned home to my family.

 

I spoke with the housing tribunal along with some friends I had made along the way. I was no longer being evicted. Also we got a new landlord pretty quick after that – coincidence?
Days turned into weeks. I kept distracted – happy, full of humor and love, with a new aspect on life. I surrounded myself with those that I wanted to be like – people that treated me the way they wanted to be treated in return – unselfish and not materialistic – people that give back to the less fortunate and expect nothing else in return. I spent a lot of time with family – my mother was with me all the way.

 

On Friday December 18th I was told that the chemo was not working as my cancer cells had spiked. I went home – I was again lost. I found comfort in everyone around me and the ones I had met on this journey. I do not consider myself religious – however I prayed.

 

I prayed for my Son,
I prayed for my Mother,
I prayed for my Wife and Unborn son,
I prayed for my Family and all Loved Ones.

 

On Monday December 2st I arrived at the doctors to continue this fight. After being prepped for chemo again my fresh blood work results came back. Due to a “false negative” on Friday my tests were wrong.

 

I was in REMISSION!!

 

Apparently someone along the way had prayed for me as well.

 

Four years later I have 1460 days to be thankful for – surrounded by the best family and friends I could ever ask for.

 

Thank you for taking the time to read,

Jonathan Elliott

Testicular Cancer Survivor Jonathan Elliott and His Family

 

Testicular Cancer Survivor Jonathan Elliott and his wife

 

A Film That’s Planting the Seed and Sparking Awareness

For Immediate Release: December 16, 2014

Image of Funeral Day the movie

Funeral Day, a darkly funny feature film, joins forces with the Testicular Cancer Society via the crowdfunding platform Seed&Spark.

Several clicks after seeing a Tweet from director/co-producer Jon Weinberg, Mike Craycraft, the founder of the Testicular Cancer Society, landed on a crowdfunding page on Seed&Spark for the independent film Funeral Day.

 

“I immediately had to reach out to Jon and see how the Testicular Cancer Society could get involved in helping bring the film to life,” says Craycraft. “The film’s storyline was so close to my own that it really hit home.”

 

Funeral Day is a comedy about a young man who believes he has found a lump on his testicle and thinks he might be dying, so he skips his friend’s funeral (who actually did die of cancer) in an attempt to start living his own life to the fullest.

 

“Since Funeral Day is a narrative film, partnering with an outside organization wasn’t the first thing on my mind. It’s something I associate more with docs,” says Weinberg, “But after talking to Mike, the ability to make a difference by working together seemed like an exciting opportunity.”

 

After feeling a lump the main character in Funeral Day refuses to go to the doctor. This reluctance to see a doctor is not uncommon in men. Craycraft, a testicular cancer survivor, waited seven months after feeling his lump before he went to the doctor.

 

“For seven months I ended up living like I was dying. I even threw my own ‘going away’ party because I was so convinced I was going to die. But I never told anyone that’s what I was doing, or that any of this was going on,” says Craycraft. “This film is going to be an invaluable tool in helping us not just raise awareness about testicular cancer but to help change how guys address their health issues.”

 

As part of the partnership, the Testicular Cancer Society will help bring the film to fruition. In return, the society will be able to incorporate the film into their testicular cancer education and awareness programs. Both the society and the producers of the film hope that by engaging in co-promotion, more men (and the woman in their lives) will become aware of testicular cancer and reduce delays they have in seeking care.

 

“We chose Seed&Spark as our crowdfunding platform because they are all about making a healthier environment in which to make films,” says Weinberg. “Now we not only have the opportunity to bring a great film to life, but actually help make men’s lives healthier too. And hopefully bring some laughs along the way”

 

To learn more about Funeral Day’s Seed&Spark campaign visit: http://www.seedandspark.com/studio/funeral-day 

 

Funeral Day is the debut feature film of co-directors Jon Weinberg and Ronnie Butler. It stars Tyler Labine (Deadbeat, The Rise of the Planet of the Apes, Tucker and Dale Vs. Evil), Tygh Runyan (Stargate Universe, the upcoming Versailles), Suzy Nakamura (Curb Your Enthusiasm, Horrible Bosses 2), Dominic Rains (A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night, Flashforward) and many others. It was written by Kris Elgstrand, an award winning screenwriter whose most recent film, Songs She Wrote About People She Knows, premiered at the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival.

 

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Testicular Cancer Society is a 501(c)3 non-profit public charity to reduce the burden of testicular cancer by increasing education and awareness and providing support services to fighters, survivors and caregivers.

Survivor Spotlight: Aaron Olson

Two Out of Three and Still Me

Testicular cancer survivor Aaron Olson shares how his perceptions of masculinity changed after diagnosis in his Survivor Spotlight video.

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